Stormwater Quality Program

Educational Grants

Previous Educational Grant Winners

The Sacramento County Stormwater Quality Program offers educational grants to do projects that increase students’ awareness of the importance of local waterways. Here are some examples of previous grant winners:

Sierra Nevada Journey’s “Hands in the River” Program

Sierra Nevada Journeys (SJN) program offers 5th grade students watershed science and storm water management using relevant and hands-on learning experiences both in the classroom and outdoors.  During the 2017/18 fiscal year, the SNJ program received funding to transport 260 students to do a field study at William B. Pond where they learned how to assess water quality and the importance of keeping our local waterways clean.


University of California 4-H Youth Development Program

The UC 4-H Youth Development program offers a Water Wizards project which ties in with after school programs. Through the Water Wizards project, 4th-6th grade students participate in hands-on learning experiences that encourage inquiry, get involved in experiments that teach basic information about watersheds and water quality, and develop a sense of stewardship as they take action on a water issue in their community. During the 2017/18 fiscal year, the grant program provided funding so that 95 students from 3 after school programs were able to visit the Bay-Delta Model after completing the Water Wizards project. The field trip deepened their understanding of watersheds and delta issues and students gained a better appreciation of our natural resources.

Will Rogers Middle School

Students explored their local waterway.
The students and teachers of Will Rogers Middle School participated in W.E.T. Water Education Training.
 
With their grant, the Will Rogers Middle School students were able to:
  • identify and stencil storm drains on the school campus
  • plant California Native plants
  • construct a rainwater catchment system
  • participate in field studies of the local watershed
  • participate in water quality experiments
  • attend field trips to local creeks and water educational centers
Read the final report for more information about this project.

Leo. A Palmiter School

Kevin Jordan, the ROP Landscape Instructor at Leo Palmiter School, used the stormwater grant money to replace the conventional landscape at their school with River-Friendly Landscaping (RFL). Besides learning about RFL and it's contribution to improved stormwater quality, the students learned how to work as a team and how to overcome obstacles. Read the final report for more information about this project.

 
Check out the www.riverfriendly.org to learn more about River-Friendly Landscaping.
 

Before and after photographs of an existing conventional lawn area that was replaced with River-Friendly Landscaping

Convential lawn area.
River-Friendly landscaping.

Global Youth Charter School

Students took water quality measurements of Dry Creek.

The Global Youth Charter School used their grant to map, research, and create marketing materials about Dry Creek.

 

The students first mapped Dry Creek and identified locations for research. Then they tested the water quality and studied the flora and fauna at the identified locations. The final phase of the project involved creating a brochure and poster to education the community about Dry Creek.

 

Read the final report for more information about this project.

Orange Grove Adult School

W.E.T. Project
With their grant, the Orange Grove Adult School students were able to:
  • identify and stencil storm drains on the Orange Grove campus
  • create a W.E.T Project storm drain educational flyer
  • plant UCD Arboretum All Star California Native plants
  • construct a rainwater catchment system
  • participate in field studies of the local watershed
  • participate in water quality experiments
  • attend the Will Rogers Middle School Earth Day Celebration and the California Green Summit Expo